Gabriella Rusk

Sports/News Video Journalist

Connect With Me

grusk@kwqc.com

 

Gabriella Rusk joined the KWQC-TV 6 Sports and News team in July of 2016.

She graduated magna cum laude from Syracuse University with a Broadcast & Digital Journalism degree from the S.I. Newhouse School of Public Communications. She also received a dual major in English and a minor in Sport Management. While at ‘Cuse, Gabriella worked tirelessly at the nation’s oldest student-run television station, CitrusTV, as a sports reporter, producer, host, and as a news anchor. She also held the position of Associate General Manager, overseeing show programming and working to build the alumni network.

In addition to school, Gabriella worked for two summers at WSVN-TV in her home of South Florida. As a sports intern, she had opportunities to cover the 2014 Miami Heat NBA Finals, the 2015 NHL Draft, and the Miami Dolphins.

Gabriella is an avid reader and book lover. She frequently reviews books on her blog, “Gabriella’s Goodreads.” She has an ardent passion for American history and her personal role models are a tie between Susan B. Anthony and J.K. Rowling.

If you want to recommend a book, share a great news story, or talk some sports, don’t hesitate to contact her!


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