Anne Hughes

Assistant News Director/Assignment Manager

Connect With Me

ahughes@kwqc.com

 

Anne Hughes started her career in 1993 working at another local station learning to run camera, edit and write for newscasts. By 2000, Anne has worked her way to full time producing and decided to come to KWQC. Since then, Anne has produced every newscast except Paula Sands Live. She has also been an Executive Producer at the station before taking over the Assignment Desk in 2010. She was promoted to Assistant News Director in 2012, but in 2014 she returned to her duties as Assignment Manager which she continues today.

Anne grew up in Omaha, Nebraska but did not attend the University of Nebraska; she is not a fan of the Cornhuskers. Instead she attended Northwest Missouri State in Maryville, Missouri. The proud Bearcat met her husband while attending Northwest. After graduating, Anne married her college sweetheart and moved to the QC. They have two amazing daughters, who are now in college. One daughter is at Iowa (Go Hawks!) and the other at UNI (Go Panthers!) Can you say house divided? They also have a third child, their golden retriever Tucker.

Anne loves photography, reading, watching HGTV and playing soccer. Anne plays in the local women’s soccer league. She loves living in the Quad Cities and is proud to call this place home.


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