Brianna Nielsen

Producer

Connect With Me

bnielsen@kwqc.com

 

Brianna Nielsen Rogers is an Emmy-nominated producer who has been with KWQC since January of 2012. She currently produces the 4 PM news but has also produced Quad Cities Today. She started at KWQC as an intern back in 2011.

Brianna is a native of the Quad Cities. She graduated from North Scott High School in 2008. She then attended Wartburg College graduating with a degree in Communications with an emphasis in Electronic Media and a minor in History in 2011. Highlights of her time there include studying abroad in Eisenach, Germany, and a service trip to New Orleans after Hurricane Katrina.

Brianna married Doug Rogers, her former co-producer of Quad Cities Today, in 2016. They live in Davenport with their Great Pyrenees mix Pokey and two rambunctious Guinea pigs, Peeta and Finnick.

In her spare time, Brianna loves to visit zoos, presidential libraries, museums, and theme parks. Some of her favorite things include pandas, owls, peacocks, Fiona the hippo, gingko trees, Frank Lloyd Wright, Herbert Hoover, the first bridge to cross the Mississippi River in 1856, broccoli, and pasta.


Trending on KWQC.com

NBC Headlines

Latino millennials least likely to identify as heterosexual, survey finds

More than one in five Latino millennials identifies as LGBTQ, according to a recent survey.

Florida's 'stand your ground' under scrutiny after father killed

"He was just trying to protect us," said the girlfriend of Markeis McGlockton, a 28-year-old father of three who was killed during a parking space dispute.

Motherhood may affect Alzheimer's risk

Women who had three kids had a lower lifetime risk of Alzheimer's than women who had only one child, researchers found.

Police release sketch of man suspected of killing Bush's former doctor

"Mark was a fantastic cardiologist and a good man," former President Bush said. "I will always be grateful for his exceptional, compassionate care."

Secret police files reopen old wounds decades after dictatorship crumbled

The machinery of the Communist apparatus relied on whisper networks of compromised people, including situations where a "brother spied on his brother."