Davenport residents and lawmakers go in depth on gun control at legislative forum

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Gun control and school safety have been the center of discussion nationwide since 17 people were killed in Parkland, Florida. Iowa legislators and residents in Davenport took on the controversial topic of gun control at a heated legislative forum, Saturday.

Residents and lawmakers say they want to come up with ways to protect their schools, children, and teachers down the road. One of those people who chose to speak out today was 17-year-old, Aubrey Young.

"How many people have to die to get weapons capable of mowing down tons of people are banned,?" she asked state legislatures.

But she wasn't the only one, a frustrated mother, expressed how scared she was as well. "One of the hardest things I've ever done is take my 15-year-old kid to central high school the day that 17 people died in Parkland Florida, so I'm mad about that," she said.

Lawmakers were also seen getting emotional on the topic. "No matter if you're a democrat or republican we have got to come together, and decide that those babies are the most important things to us," said Democratic State Representative, Phyllis Thede.

"It's a mental health issue, it's a background check issue it's an age which to buy a gun issue, it's a second amendment issue," said Republican State Representative, Gary Mohr.

While some questioned school funding and banning certain guns like AR-15's, Representative, Gary Mhor says if anyone tries to ban those guns, he "guarantees there will be a court challenge to that."

Democrat Representative, Monica Kurth says she believes the 'Extreme Risk and Protection Act' would be effective. It's an act through a court order that allows a person’s guns to be taken away from them if they are perceived to be a risk by a judge or mental health expert.

"It's not a permanent taking away but it may be enough time to allow people to reassess where they are and maybe get that help that they need so that they're not in that same situation where they're a risk to others or themselves," Kurth said.

With so many different opinions and frustrations roaming through the forum, many say they're just glad to keep the conversation going.