Presidential Candidate Profile: Mitt Romney - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Presidential Candidate Profile: Mitt Romney

Our presidential profile series continues with the former Governor of Massachusetts Mitt Romney. He's been campaigning for the Republican nomination full-time since February, 2007. But there's a difference during this election cycle. The campaign has seen candidates rise and fall, but Romney has remained at the top of the polls as a front runner for much of the campaign.

Romney is no stranger to Republican voters, especially in Iowa. In 2008, during his first campaign for the White House, he carried most of the counties in the TV6 viewing area, finishing second overall in the caucuses to former Arkansas Governor Mike Huckabee. But Romney failed to capture enough energy in the Hawkeye state to win in the Granite state, a fact that ultimately lead to the end of his campaign.

This go around is different. Romney is sharp in his debates and disciplined with his message.

"My view is the key to a tax policy, is to reduce a tax burden on the people who've been hurt most by the Obama economy, " Romney said during a recent campaign stop.

Willard "Mitt" Romney is a husband and a father to 5 sons, a grandfather to 16. He served one term as the governor of Massachusetts and was in charge of the Olympic Games in Salt Lake in 2002. He was born in Michigan and trained in politics by his father, George, who was governor of the state and a cabinet secretary under President Nixon. But most of all, Romney is campaigning on his private-sector experience, that's netted him a fortune valued at over $200 million.

"We need to have people in government who've had experience in the private sector and who knows how to balance budgets and I do and I'll get that job done," Said Romney.

If elected, Romney says he would work to repeal the health care reform law passed under President Obama and demand programs like Medicaid be turned over to the states.

"So I'll take one of the biggest programs, Medicaid, healthcare for the poor, and send that back to the states with the dollars that go with it," said Romney.

He says he wants to cut the corporate tax rate to 25 percent, eliminate taxes on interest and capitol gains for the middle class, issue permits for more drilling off America's coasts, and cut the federal payroll by 10 percent.

"I think its time for programs that we like or simply can't afford, to be stopped or be cutback and to make it on their own and I'm going to do that," he added.

But while he wants to cut federal jobs, departments and programs, he also wants to make sure the federal workers that do work are compensated fairly

"I want to make sure that people who work for the federal government are fairly paid and as a way to assure that's the case, I'm going to tie their compensation and benefits to those that exist in the private sector."

Buts it's not what Romney will do as president that's preventing him from capturing more than 20 percent of Republican support in the polls, it's what he has done in the past that leaves conservatives questioning his core.

He was once pro-choice. He is now pro-life. He mandated healthcare as governor in Massachusetts. He's against any mandates of the federal health care law, now. And because he stands as a front runner, he's taking shots of potential flip-flops, not only from Republican rivals, but from President Obama's administration.

"If he thought he had to say the sky was green and the grass was blue to win an election he'd say it,"

Attacks from Obama's team are good, Romney's team tells TV6. They say it means you're leading and it also gives reason to fight back at the White House, which Romney does at every stop across the country.

After one term under his presidency, we will have amassed under his presidency, as much debt as all the prior presidents combined," claims Romney.