Sen. Chuck Grassley Declines Comment On Mourdock "Rape" Remark - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Sen. Chuck Grassley Declines Comment On Mourdock "Rape" Remark

Updated:
Sen. Charles Grassley (R) of Iowa declined to comment on Richard Mourdock's "rape" remark. Sen. Charles Grassley (R) of Iowa declined to comment on Richard Mourdock's "rape" remark.
Indiana Republican Senate candidate Richard Mourdock said Tuesday that "I think that even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen." Indiana Republican Senate candidate Richard Mourdock said Tuesday that "I think that even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen."
Rep. Bobby Schilling (R-Ill.) said Wednesday, “I urge Murdock to apologize. As a husband, father and grandfather, I find his comments totally contrary to our basic human beliefs & values.” Rep. Bobby Schilling (R-Ill.) said Wednesday, “I urge Murdock to apologize. As a husband, father and grandfather, I find his comments totally contrary to our basic human beliefs & values.”

DAVENPORT, Iowa – Republican U.S. Senator Charles Grassley of Iowa declined Thursday to give an opinion on the recent controversial statement on abortion made by Indiana Republican Senate candidate Richard Mourdock.

During a Tuesday night debate Mourdock stated, "The only exception I have to have an abortion is in the case of the life of the mother. I struggled with it myself for a long time, but I came to realize life is that gift from God. I think that even when life begins in that horrible situation of rape, that it is something that God intended to happen."

During an interview Thursday morning with KWQC-TV, anchor David Nelson read Mourdock's quote and asked Sen. Grassley his reaction to it.

"I did hear the reports on this," Grassley said.  "I don't know what the context was, but I know this:  I'm pro-life and I know this, we're not going to overturn Roe v. Wade without a constitutional amendment and the chances of getting a two-thirds vote for a constitutional amendment is pretty limited."

When asked whether he condemns the comment by Mourdock, Sen. Grassley said, "I have not read his statement, so I'm not going to condemn something when I don't know exactly what it is.  I want to see the context that it's in."

When asked whether he supports Mourdock's run for the Senate, Senator Grassley said, "I haven't been asked to support it or not support it."

Some Republicans have been quick to condemn the comment.  Rep. Bobby Schilling (R-Ill.), who represents voters in KWQC's viewing area, tweeted less than 24 hours after Mourdock's comment:  "I urge Murdock to apologize. As a husband, father and grandfather, I find his comments totally contrary to our basic human beliefs & values."

Republican New Hampshire Sen. Kelly Ayotte canceled her trip to campaign with Mourdock on Wednesday, the day after he made the comment.  An Ayotte spokesperson said Ayotte "disagrees with… Mourdock's comments, which do not represent her views."

The day before Mourdock made the controversial comment, Republican presidential candidate Mitt Romney on Monday released a TV ad endorsing Mourdock for the Senate.  The Romney campaign has since condemned Mourdock's statement but has not rescinded its endorsement nor asked Mourdock to stop running Gov. Romney's ad.

On Wednesday the Romney campaign said, "We disagree on [Mourdock's] policy regarding exceptions for rape and incest but still support him."

Former Republican New Jersey Gov. Christie Todd Whitman said Wednesday that "Mourdock's comments damage all Republicans and especially Romney as the fight for the woman's vote intensifies. This could be a defining moment for Romney and he should immediately denounce both Mourdock and the comment."

A recent USA Today/Gallup poll taken Oct. 5-11 among voters in 12 swing states, including Iowa, found that abortion – more than jobs or healthcare – is the single greatest issue among women in the upcoming election.  Thirty-nine percent of registered female voters said abortion is "the most important issue for women."

Romney vs. the wind energy tax credit

Sen. Grassley endorses Mitt Romney, but Mitt Romney does not endorse extending the wind energy tax credit that is due to expire at the end of this year.

Steffen Schmidt, a political science professor at Iowa State University, told the Los Angeles Times in August that the tax credit is vital to Iowa's wind industry and without governmental help Iowa "ethanol plants will go dark, farmers will go bankrupt, and the wind industry will go silent."

Gov. Romney has labeled the wind energy and similar tax credits a "boondoggle" and indicated the jobs created by such are "imaginary."  Senator Grassley said last summer that losing the wind energy tax credit could cost 4,000 jobs in Iowa and that he was upset the Romney campaign did not consult him before opposing an extension.

"I think the mistake that Romney made and his people made when they suggested wind energy, they shouldn't have just picked tax wind energy out of 60 tax credits that are expiring at the end of the year," Grassley said Thursday on KWQC.  "It should have been expressed in terms of corporate tax reform."

Grassley said that if Romney is elected Romney's opposition to renewing the wind energy tax credit "doesn't concern me because I know how Congress operates.  When we take up one of these tax credits, it isn't going to eliminate just one tax credit."

Grassley went on to explain that Congress will "look at the entire picture of energy as well as research and development – that's a bigger one than any of the others – and look at them in the picture of overall corporate tax reform.  Because we've got to be structuring our corporate taxes so we can compete with the rest of other world."

Calling China a currency manipulator

Gov. Romney promises to label China as a currency manipulator "on day one" of his presidency if elected.  This means that China is artificially strengthening the American dollar in order to make Chinese currency cheaper and thereby make Chinese exports more competitive.

When asked if he supports this move, Senator Grassley said, "Absolutely.  It should have been done in the Bush administration."

Failure to assign this label to China, Grassley said, has "given them an indirect subsidy to their exports, which is very unfair to our manufacturing, and they should have been considered a currency manipulator years ago."

 

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