What's Next For Dixon? - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

What's Next For Dixon?

Updated: Nov 14, 2012 06:10 PM CST

Crundwell's ranch, once full of her prized quarter horses, now sits empty. Today's guilty plea gives federal marshals the go ahead to sell off what's left.  

A lot has changed since Crundwell left her office at Dixon City Hall in April too. 

"First of all the blinds are up, the blinds were always half down and closed when Rita was here," Dixon Mayor James Burke says. 

A better look into an office, now with nothing to hide, the name and title on the desk and door have changed, and a closer eye is kept on the books, now with multiple people signing off on city checks and accounts.  

Now that there is a guilty plea, the city may see money back in its accounts sooner. 

"They have not been able to do anything with the jewelry, the real estate until there's a conviction or guilty plea," Burke says, "I understand they can move ahead with that." 

So far, Crundwell's horses have brought in $7.4 million back to the city, and federal law allows officials to take additional assets as needed up to 20 years after Crundwell gets out of prison. 

"I think everyone is going to feel a little better, once there's restitution and dough starts coming in," Burke says.

Though the city is a long way from getting that $53 million back, Burke says he is spending his time moving the city forward, and not looking back. 

"I'm not a vindictive person, this whole thing is a pity, a tragedy," he says, "I don't feel any compassion for her, but nobody's life is over until it's over." 

Federal marshals handling the sale still need to decide if they will sell all the real estate and farm land by auction or proceed with a regular sale. Its unknown how long that may take.