Fairport Fish Hatchery - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Fairport Fish Hatchery

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You'll find it along Highway 22 in Muscatine County. It's been a fixture there for about a hundred years. The Fairport Fish Hatchery produces some of the best recreational bluegill, bass, and walleye in the state of Iowa.

One of the main functions at the hatchery is to strip eggs from a female walleye, fertilize them, place them in a water-clay mixture, and then place them in jars where they hatch. The walleyes are stocked in rivers located in northeast and central Iowa. Some of those fish will grow to be eight to ten pounders.

At one time, the hatchery was regarded as the national center for freshwater fish research. Today, the Iowa Department of Natural Resources uses many earthen ponds to hatch bass and bluegills. Biologist Ken Snyder says the hatchery raises the only bass and bluegills in the state.

Visitors are always welcome. Group tours can be arranged.