Proposed Davenport Boundary Change Impacts - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Proposed Davenport Boundary Change Impacts

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The Davenport school board expects to make a decision on its new school boundaries in two weeks.

Changing the way students have been able to pick and choose schools in the past to balance out building enrollments.

A ban on transfers at all levels of the district could significantly change how students pick and choose schools.

Right now high school boundaries are "soft", students can pick and choose which high school they attend no matter if they live in that schools' lines.

Causing some buildings to be more full than others.

The board will have to decide if it wants to stop transfers between high schools.

A tricky option on the table because some of the high schools offer unique programs, but the superintendent believes stopping transfers at the lower grade levels with new boundaries will accomplish the same goal.

"To put a boundary right down the middle of 60th street, where families live on the south side of the street go to Harrison, and families that live on the north side of the street go to Fillmore is just simply wrong," says Harrison neighbor Robert Saul.

Under the current boundary proposals students will begin attending their new school next fall if the board approves. An issue that has caused an uproar in a neighborhood split by a new line.

"There are kids that are on the same street that are going to go to one school, while there are other kids who for whatever reason are going to get sent to another school," says parent Ryan Cannady.

He picked his home in the Harrison boundary because of the neighborhood. He describes it as a tight knit place that takes pride in its school.

"When we went to buy the house we drove through and were blown away by how many kids were running around in the street, riding bikes," says Cannady.

Superintendent Art Tate knows redrawing the lines will anger some of his district's parents.

That's why he's including a grandfather option as part of the boundary reset. Students can continue attending their current school even if their home gets redrawn. Until they graduate to the next level. Balancing the lower grades and fixing the feeder systems to help balance out the high schools.

"That would help a lot, the board is really, they've been talking about whether they want to do that at the high school level, I think they understand, we've got to become a little big stricter about letting people go from one attendance area to another," says Tate.

He says the board may choose to leave the high school boundaries soft. Letting the feeder systems do their work, and having parents pick up the cost of moving their child to a different high school.

"You can go to any high school you desire provided you find transportation there," say Tate.

A vote on the boundaries is expected in two weeks.

The school board considers the high school boundaries a separate issue.