Figuring Out Erosion Issues In A Le Claire Neighborhood - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Figuring Out Erosion Issues In A Le Claire Neighborhood

Updated:

     Sinking sidewalks and damaged streets have been going on for years now in one Le Claire neighborhood. Now, city leaders are finding out more about the problem.
    Crews did what's called "mud jacking" up in the Bluffs subdivision as recent as the end of 2012 where underground voids are filled to help stop the sinking and erosion. But Monday, on some spots near 8th Street and Bridgeview a homeowner showed us how a measuring stick can reach as far as 15 inches below the surface between concrete slabs. The city is getting closer to figuring out the issue and finding a solution.
     "A neighbor's driveway is sinking again and we have more sinkage in our area. We're seeing plates in the street definitely still sinking," said Billie Edwards. The portion of 8th Street in front of her house has been closed for months, considered unsafe for traffic because of the erosion beneath the surface.
     It looks like several factors have contributed to the issue. "Some drainage that caused our problems some of the fill could have washed away pretty easy," said Mayor Bob Scannell.
     Studies found there are issues with not only surface water drainage, but lack of backfill at curbs, poorly compacted dirt, a lack of subsurface drains, and it's all on top of a type of soil that can easily erode. The next step, if city leaders approve, is to have more soil samples done and have crews come in with ground penetrating radar.
     "So they have some idea of what's underneath the concrete and what we can do with it," added Mayor Scannell. Whether that's continue to mud jack and fill in the gaps, which the city has already invested several hundred thousand dollars in, or build new.
     "I think the streets are going to have to be at least partially tore up and redone. It's going to be an expensive project," he said.
     Council will decide on the third phase of the study at next week's meeting. Phase one and two cost more than $70,000 and this would tack on an additional $38,000.