Making Daycare Safer In Illinois - News and Weather For The Quad Cities -

Making Daycare Safer In Illinois

Updated: Aug 28, 2013 05:49 PM

More exercise and healthier eating. 

These are guideline schools are already implementing.

Now, Illinois daycares could be doing the same.

Some of the proposed changes include getting kids outside for at least an hour everyday and keeping those younger than two away from the TV.

Also limiting what kids can eat or drink.

Some daycares are already doing this.

One local director says it's a good idea - but adding these extra expectations can make providing excellent childcare a bit harder.

"It's almost gotten to the point where you have to put proper care for the kids aside to follow all these rules." 

This is what Keonia Upchurch said - Director of the Moline Kids Campus Daycare - after being asked how hard it is to care for all her students with some many guideline and regulations.

And she says new ones - could make teachers' jobs - even tougher.

"I fully understand they are there for what is best for the kids. To keep them healthy and keep them safe, However, like I said, it's a lot."

Many of the new guideline that are being considered are already followed here at Kids Campus. 

But making TV off limits for kids under tow is a regulation that the staff, and kids - don't enjoy.

"That's a really hard thing for the kids because not that we are all about TV - but what we would use is educational videos," explains Upchurch. "We incorporate those into our lesson plans and to take that away, we have to find a new trick."

But Upchurch says her - and her staff will find a way to educate kids. 

But as for keeping them outside for an hour everyday - that may be a tough one for teachers to enforce. 

"They say the heat can be up to 90 degrees. I don't want a 6 month old baby outside in 90 degree weather. My son is 8, I don't want him outside in 90 degree weather."

And while Upchurch says she know the changes are being considered for the good of the kids - she things the state should consult those in the classroom - before make new changes. 

"What I always say and what I strongly believe," Upchurch explains. "Is that they based child care off of books, not off of knowledge or hands on things." 

Right now - these change are just being considered. 

If they are put into law - a spokesman from the Illinois Department of Children and Family services confirmed it won't be fore six to nine months.