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Two IL mayors react to new region two restrictions

Two mayors in region two took to social media this week to announce they won’t be implementing Illinois' new restrictions that went into effect on November 4.
Published: Nov. 7, 2020 at 9:23 AM CST|Updated: Nov. 4, 2020 at 11:00 PM CST
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Illinois (KWQC) - Two mayors in region two took to social media this week to announce they won’t be implementing Illinois' new restrictions that went into effect on November 4.

Region two includes Rock Island, Henry, and Bureau Counties. Under the new rules, all indoor dining and bar service will be suspended for at least two weeks.

The mayors of Princeton and Kewanee took to Facebook to address the new restrictions. Both said they won’t be enforcing the new mandates.

“I completely respect the office of our governor and I appreciate the idea behind the new mitigations. The issue that I have is that the zones that have been set up are so large that they encompass very large jurisdictional lines, very large communities, and these smaller communities are being lumped in with these larger ones where there is more of an issue and there’s more personal contact,” said Gary Moore, the mayor of Kewanee.

Joe Quiram, the mayor of Princeton, said they don’t have the legal authority to enforce the restrictions.

“There’s no law, supporting the governor’s orders that give municipalities, the right to go in and write tickets and close businesses,” he said.

Quiram also said he personally thinks these decisions should be up to the counties.

“Each county should be able to address their own situations, based on their own populations based on the numbers that they’re seeing individually, instead of these regions because what’s happening in Peoria, or what’s happening in the Quad Cities. That doesn’t necessarily mean that’s what’s happening in Princeton or Bureau County, because it’s not,” he said.

Quiram said they need to get through this, but also stay cognizant.

“We have a community in Princeton. Everybody that lives in a town is part of a community. They all have businesses that people have invested their life in and there’s a dire forecast if things continue to go on and, you know, people expect businesses to close. Because they will close and they will close permanently at some point.”

“We have to do what we can to keep our community as viable...if we don’t support our businesses we don’t have a community for them to even be at so we need to take care of our businesses and make sure that they are taken care of,” Moore said.

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