Cedric Haynes

Meteorologist

Connect With Me

chaynes@kwqc.com

 

Meteorologist Cedric Haynes joined the KWQC TV-6 First Alert Team in November of 2017. Cedric has spent most of his life in the south, but is excited to experience a true Midwest winter! Cedric’s interest in weather began when he was 7 years old, when a tornado destroyed his neighborhood. The same storm dropped nearly 30 inches of snow days later. Cedric’s fascination with that storm led him to strongly pursue his interest in weather.

Cedric graduated from the University of Cincinnati, majoring in Electronic Media, along with participating on the U.C. Drumline, before transferring to Mississippi State University to become a Broadcast Meteorologist.

After college, Cedric spent a few years tracking hurricanes and big flood events at KPLC-TV in Lake Charles, LA. In 2014, Cedric was promoted to morning meteorologist at KLTV and KTRE in East Texas. Cedric had the opportunity to track several tornadoes, ice storms, heatwaves, and even a drought.

Cedric’s passion for weather stems from his strong belief in being able to provide the viewers with necessary information to plan your day, along with helping to keep folks alert of changing conditions.
When Cedric is not delivering your forecast, you can catch him usually watching his favorite sports teams: Cincinnati Bengals, Cincinnati Bearcats, and of course the Tennessee Volunteers.

Cedric is also very passionate about giving back to the community. He is an active member of his church, a strong supporter of Fellowship of Christian Athletes and loves mentoring the youth, and giving back to the community.


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