Mike Ortiz

Chief Photographer/VideoJournalist

Connect With Me

MOrtiz@kwqc.com

 

MO graduated from St. Ambrose College in December of 1996. He began his career here at KWQC as a photographer in July of 1987 (back in the days of a camera attached to a recorder with ¾ inch tape!)

MO became Chief Photographer in January of 1995, supervising a staff of 9 photographers.

In March of 2004, he took a job in the Sales Department at KWQC, but in May of 2005, he came back to the News Department to take over duties as the Assignment Editor. At the same time, he was appointed by the State of Iowa as the Media Coordinator for the 7th Judicial District of Iowa.

But changes in the newsroom struck again. MO decided to go back to being Chief Photographer again!

In 2012, the 14 Judicial Circuit of Illinois, which includes Rock Island County, became the very first district in Illinois to start a Cameras in the Courtroom Pilot Program, and MO was appointed Media Coordinator for this Pilot Program.

July 13, 2017 marks 30 years for MO at KWQC!


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NBC Headlines

4 killed, another wounded in Utah shooting; suspect in custody

The circumstances of the shooting, which occurred around 7 p.m. in Grantsville, were not clear, but police said there is no threat to the public.

Winter storms bringing bone-chilling temperatures to Midwest and Northeast

Temperatures are forecast to be in the mid-20s at the kickoff of the AFC title game in Kansas City on Sunday, with the mercury dropping to the teens by the fourth quarter.

Former Guantanamo Bay commander convicted of hindering inquiry into man's death

John Nettleton was accused of misleading investigators in the death of Christopher M. Tur, a loss-prevention manager at the facility who drowned in 2015.

L.A. teachers sue Delta after jet fuel spill over schools, playgrounds

"Students began screaming and crying because their eyes and skin were burning. Fear, dread, panic, and helplessness ensued," according to a teacher.

What is The Base? FBI arrest of alleged white supremacists puts focus on extremist group

The decentralized neo-Nazi movement has chapters across the U.S. and the world, and experts say members' threats of violence should be taken seriously.