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Cousin of murdered three year old Kewanee girl speaks out after man sentenced in her death is released

The cousin of a three-year-old Kewanee girl who was killed in 1995 is sharing his disappointment over the man convicted of her death being released from prison. (KWQC)
The cousin of a three-year-old Kewanee girl who was killed in 1995 is sharing his disappointment over the man convicted of her death being released from prison. (KWQC)(KWQC)
Published: Jan. 15, 2020 at 7:59 PM CST
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The cousin of a three-year-old Kewanee girl who was killed in 1995 is sharing his disappointment over the man convicted of her death being released from prison. He served half of his 50-year sentence.

Missed opportunity and questions still linger through Rich Pollock’s mind as to what his three-year-old cousin Jami Sue Pollock would have been doing at this age.

“She'd be 27-years-old now, but, she didn't get that opportunity,” he said.

Jami Sue was murdered in 1995, in Kewanee. Police sentenced Scott English in connection to her death. The former boyfriend of Jami’s mother. Rich was 15, at the time Jami died.

“The weekend before that she had been at our house for that weekend. She’s my cousin but we were a lot closer than just cousins,” he said.

Pollock had been tracking English’s case when last month he got an email putting a twist to the case.

“December 23rd, two days before Christmas it was auto-generated saying that he had been released,” he said.

According to the Henry County State's Attorney, English was released from prison due to a law that stated anyone convicted of first-degree murder could be eligible for day to day credit. Which allowed his sentence to be cut in half. Rich says they didn't know English was getting released until he already was. He feels the justice system failed him.

“I don't think that it would be doing any service to her by remaining silent and her killer is now allowed to roam free,” he said.

He says he will continue to advocate for his cousin. So the same thing doesn't happen again.

“The only path forward is to not forget, when we forget things as a society. We tend to repeat them,”

The Henry County State's Attorney says the current “Truth in Sentencing” law states a person convicted of first-degree murder shall receive no sentence credit and has to serve the entire sentence imposed by the court. So if English committed the same offense today. He would serve all 50 years as opposed to what happened where he got out in 25 years.

Police originally charged Jami Sue’s mother in this case, but, her conviction was overturned by the Illinois Supreme Court.

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