‘Testing is critical;’ Gov. Reynolds urges Iowans to get tested for COVID-19

DES MOINES, Iowa (KWQC) - After Iowa Governor Kim Reynolds (R) announced anyone in Iowa can get a COVID-19 test, she reported by 8 a.m. Friday, 1,700 people had already signed up. The Governor urged people returning to work, healthcare workers, first responders, and anyone who thinks they have symptoms to take the test, saying, "Testing is critical."

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Some Iowans have reported issues in signing up for the tests through this website. Gov. Reynolds asks Iowans who are having problems with the site, to provide feedback so any bugs can be fixed.

People who want to be tested must take the assessment on the Test Iowa website and make an appointment with the site closest to them. Iowans can find testing sites through the website. A new Test Iowa Clinic in Burlington will start scheduling appointments on Tuesday, May 26th.

Meanwhile, as more businesses reopen Friday and next week, Governor Reynolds thanked a Bettendorf gym owner who is giving back. The owner of Live Action 563 was set to receive a second round of funding through the state's Small Business Relief Program, but wrote a letter, asking for the money to be given to another business owner who needed it.

The Iowa Department of Public Health (IDPH) reported 461 new cases of the novel coronavirus (COVID-19) to its website Friday, as of 11:00 a.m. An additional 17 deaths were reported in 24 hours.

The site is now being updated in real-time, allowing Iowans to check the total number of cases throughout the day. By late Friday morning, IDPH reported a total of 16,408 cases statewide and a total of 418 deaths.

The site also shows 8,804 Iowans are recovering. The total number of people tested now stands at 119,462.

Meanwhile, the IDPH announced no new cases of multisystem inflammatory syndrome in Iowa children have been reported.

In closing, while many businesses reopen, Governor Reynolds urged Iowans to remain vigilant, "While life is beginning to feel more normal, we cannot forget that the virus still lives in our communities."