Two new positive cases of coronavirus reported in Muscatine County

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DES MOINES, Iowa (KWQC) - The Iowa Department of Public Health has been notified of 19 additional positive cases of Iowans with the new coronavirus, COVID-19, for a total of 124 cases, officials said Tuesday.

The new cases include two adults between the ages of 61 and 80 from Muscatine County, bringing the total number to five.

The other cases are:
• Black Hawk, an adult between the ages of 41and 60.
• Buchanan County, an adult between the ages of 41 and 60.
• Cedar County, an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.
• Dallas County, an adult between the ages of 41 and 60.
• Jasper County, an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.
• Johnson County, a middle-aged adult, and one older adult.
• Polk County, three adults; an adult between the ages of 41 and 60; an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.
• Poweshiek County, an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.
• Story County, an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.
• Tama County, an adult between the ages of 41 and 60.
• Warren County, an adult between the ages of 18 and 40.
• Washington County, an adult between the ages of 61 and 80.

A status report of monitoring and testing of COVID19 in Iowa is provided by IDPH and can be found
here
. A public hotline also has been established for Iowans with questions about COVID-19. The line is available 24/7 by calling 2-1-1 or 1-800-244-7431.

The state of Iowa has started sharing the number of negative tests conducted at outside labs and is providing additional information on the conditions of those infected with COVID-19.

Reynolds said Tuesday during a press conference that while social media can be a blessing, it can also be a curse. She urged Iowans to "be intentional" with how they are using social media and to follow credible sources.

Iowa Department of Public Health Deputy Director Sarah Reisetter said Tuesday that the spread they are seeing is the spread they were anticipating. They do expect to see the numbers go up this week and Reisetter said she thinks it will be a while for the impact of social distancing to be reflective of case count.

She said she does not believe it is necessary at this time for a shelter in place order to into effect, as a shelter in place for two or three weeks will not cause the coronavirus to go away.

Reisetter said the virus is circulating around the world and can be re-introduced into communities from different places. There is currently no treatment or vaccine available and that is why it is important to use the public health's mitigation strategies that are available to use at the right times.

These strategies are recommended by the department of public health and is used as part of a layered approach intended to slow the spread of the virus in the state of Iowa.

Reynolds said she will work with her team to get information sent out soon for those who are having concerns over what are essential workers and non-essential workers. She said the state follows the guidelines laid out by homeland security emergency website and that most states use that same site.