Local business reacts to bill making Daylight Saving Time permanent

MOLINE, Ill. (KWQC) - Soon when you cross the Mississippi River, you may be in a different time zone when you get to the other side. It could happen under a bill overwhelmingly passed by the Illinois Senate which would have Illinois staying on daylight saving time year-round.

Soon when you cross the Mississippi River, you may be in a different time zone when you get to the other side. It could happen under a bill overwhelmingly passed by the Illinois Senate which would have Illinois staying on daylight saving time year-round.

This change would affect anyone who would cross over the river for half of the year. The Illinois Senate voted 44 to 2 for a bill that would make daylight saving time permanent. If the bill is passed by the house, the year-round daylight saving time could begin in March of next year. The Uniform Time Act of 1966 established daylight saving time so we could get an extra hour of sunlight at the end of our day. So, attempting to get rid of it came a surprise to some.

Rebecca Burns, owner of The Shameless Chocaholic said, "it's gonna be a little confusing at first getting readjusted to it. If I have an appointment scheduled in Iowa, I'm gonna have to be really conscious of my time, more conscious than I already am."

The Illinois bill hoping to spring forward, and stay there. Iowa resident Rich Brown said, "it'll take you a bit of time to adjust, wouldn't it? And by the time you get adjusted to the time the other state is adjusted, it wouldn't be anymore! It'd be a little bit of confusion there."

Even more confusing for business owners, having to think about their hours of operation, knowing they're only five minutes across from a different time zone. "I'm a little bit shocked actually. I don't see the point in changing something that's already in place. Especially since Iowa won't be changing their time zones. It'll be very confusing for my customer base. We have 2 hours but we'll have 2 different time zones, so it could potentially cause a little bit of confusion."

Those customers already planning ahead, "if I was living in Iowa and working in Illinois, the clocks in my house would all be set for Illinois time. Of course, that would cause trouble for those appointments on the Iowa side. It's a bit of an inconvenience but at the same time it's the time to exercise some mental activities and stay on top of it," said Brown.

Some of the benefits and original reasons for switching hours was because it saves energy. If you get one more hour of sunlight in the evening, you'll lose electricity.
The U.S. Department of Transportation says Daylight Saving Time also saves lives since you'll get into fewer accidents if you can see roads better during the daytime.

We created a poll on our Facebook page asking you what you thought about the bill. With nearly 3,000 votes in three hours, 60% said they wanted daylight saving time to be permanent, while 40% want it to stay how it is now.

These are some of the comments: Laurie Hollister said, "Do you know how insane this would be for people that live in Illinois and work in Iowa? Or vice versa?" Dianne Collins McDole responded with " it's really not that big of a deal. I lived in Indiana for two years on eastern time, and my husband worked in Illinois in the central time zone... it's truly not that hard to manage," she said.

If it does become law and congress cooperates, Illinois would spring forward one-hour next March as usual. Then it would not fall back an hour next November.