Mom can sue Six Flags over fingerprinting and privacy

SPRINGFIELD, Illinois (AP) - The Illinois Supreme Court has ruled a mother can sue Six Flags Great America for fingerprinting her child after the purchase of a season pass.

Stacy Rosenbach sued the Gurnee theme park in 2016 about two years after her son, Alexander, was required to be electronically fingerprinted as part of having a season pass.

An appellate court ruled in 2017 that Rosenbach never demonstrated a direct injury or adverse effect and couldn't cite the state law for her lawsuit. The decision was overturned Friday by the Supreme Court.

The opinion means Rosenbach may proceed with her lawsuit claiming Six Flags violated the Biometric Privacy Act. The law is considered by privacy groups to be the nation's strongest for safeguarding identifiers such as facial features, fingerprints and iris scans.

Great America spokeswoman Tess Claussen declined to comment, citing the pending litigation.