QCA comes together with Kippah Day in support of the Jewish community

Usually, there are about 30 people at the Shabbat service. This time though, there were about...
Usually, there are about 30 people at the Shabbat service. This time though, there were about three times that! Many of them attending a Jewish service for their first time, helping the Jewish community.(KWQC)
Published: Jan. 31, 2020 at 11:16 PM CST
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The Quad Cities came together on Friday night to show support for the Jewish community by wearing kippas, otherwise known as yarmulkes.

Usually, there are about 30 people at the Shabbat service. This time though, there were about three times that! Many of them attending a Jewish service for their first time, helping the Jewish community.

"This is a very good sabbath, I warmly welcome everybody who is here," said Rabbi Linda Bertenthal.

The room was full of yarmulkes: pink, blue, black - all for the same purpose. "We cover the top of our head since God is above us and all around us," said Rabbi Bertenthal.

Some were wearing yarmulkes for the first time. "It makes us sensitive to knowing what it feels like something like this. Or even a hijab for Muslims. It's good to know things about some religions we're not familiar with," said Joseph D'Souza who was raised Catholic.

"I wore it all day and had some people ask things of me, but it's an important time to be supporting the Jewish community," said Eric Stewart who is Lutheran and Augustana College's Religion Professor.

According to the

, in 2018 there were over 1500 anti-religious hate crimes in the United States. Anti-Semitic hate crimes took up 57.8% of the total. The next highest category was against Muslims with 14.5%, Sikh the next highest category with 4.1% of total crimes.

"We know hatred is here in the Quad Cities too but we know that our Quad Citizens are people of love and goodwill who want to respect everyone," shared Rabbi Bertenthal.

"It's an important thing to do. An easy way to call attention to the Jewish community and to show our support to our brothers and sisters who are Jewish," said Stewart.

By breaking bread and maybe trying something new, the community created new relationships.

"We want to create a community of love and kindness and goodwill," added Rabbi Bertenthal.

The event was put together with the help of One Human Family QCA, a group that's also stepped up when the mosque in New Zealand was attacked.

Kippah day is part of a series, the first wave focused on religious freedom, the second wave will focus on racial discrimination.